Almost a month into the mayhem that has become Tim Tebow mania, the former star quarterback finally made his debut with the New York Mets instructional league.

While the Internet has made a frenzy of Tebow’s newest endeavor, spewing out the latest memes and hot takes, Jeff Samardzija has made a case that trumps them all.

That only stings a little bit.

The San Francisco Giants pitcher rode the dual-sport athlete train at Notre Dame all the way until draft day. He chose to forgo football to turn an early-round NFL draft pick into a fifth-round selection by the Chicago Cubs in 2006.

Samardzija didn’t offer more comment on Tebow’s new hopeful career path and brushed off the subject.

But is it too much to even call Tebow’s new role a career path? A 29-year-old surrounded by an average age of 21 doesn’t seem like the most viable choice, especially when the 29 year old is the only one who gets to keep his day job. Which adds another log on the controversial fire – is it all just a P.R. stunt?

Baseball Essential’s Kyle O’Neill wrote recently that actions speak louder than words and proves a point: a guy who hasn’t had any baseball experience since high school is now able to miss certain workouts and offseason activities to fulfill his duties as an analyst for The SEC Network.

The average player isn’t allowed to work elsewhere and makes due on terrible pay just to achieve a dream. What’s Tebow really trying to achieve if he doesn’t have to suffer through the grind that it takes to reach the show?

“I’m ready for that grind and I embrace it,” Tebow said.

Not every player has a hospital in the Philippines, a network TV job or a book coming out. Aside from struggling to keep up with the age deficit and lack of experience, where is the grind?

Even the most optimistic of fans have to admit that whether this is a stunt or not, the opinions and the odds are against him. Samardzija made it to the highest level in two sports before choosing one. Tebow fell out of football and then decided to give baseball a shot 10 years later.

The chances of him making it to the show are slim. Some experts credit him with a decent swing and a fair amount of power, which is enough to be a designated hitter at the Double-A level – maybe.

It’s hard to argue with Samardzija’s approach to the whole situation. “I’m not too worried about it,” he went on to say. If Tebow most likely won’t make it past Double-A, should we be worried either?

About The Author

In pursuit of a degree in Sports Journalism from Auburn University, Emily contributes to Baseball Essential while maintaining the position of Sports Editor at The Auburn Plainsman. You can follow her on twitter @emmmilliaa for Auburn, life and baseball hoopla.

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One Response

  1. Biff Artnie

    “Samardzija made it to the highest level in two sports before choosing one.” He never played in the NFL. Unless he has a secret career in the NBA or NHL or PGA this is wrong.


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