Ichiro Suzuki told Bob Costas in an interview, set to air on Monday, November 10 on MLB Network, that he full intends to play another Major League season.

The 41-year-old free agent outfielder said that he has “every intention” of playing in the big leagues next season, but he is not yet sure where he will call home.

“I can tell you unequivocally that even though I’m 41-years-old, I will be playing somewhere next year,” Suzuki said in an MLB Network interview. “That I can say with complete conviction.”

Suzuki has been very durable throughout his 14-year career in the MLB. He has played in at least 143 games in each season. During last season’s 143 games, he slashed .284/.324/.340 with the New York Yankees. He added 15 stolen bases.

In his Japanese (NBP) career with the Orix BlueWave from 1992-2000, he ripped a .353 batting average with 1,278 hits, 118 home runs, 529 RBI’s, and 199 stolen bases. In his American (MLB) career with the Seattle Mariners (2001-2012) and the Yankees (2012-2014), he has hit .317, with 112 home runs, 717 RBI’s along with 2,844 total hits and 487 stolen bases.

Suzuki has won multiple Japanese Awards: NPB All-Star (1994-200), PL MVP (1994-1996),  Best Nine Award (1994-200), Matsutaro Shoriki Award (1994, 1995, 2004), Japan Professional Sports Grand Prize (1994, 1995, 2001), PL Batting Champion (1994-2000), PL Safe Hit Champion (1994-1998), PL On-Base Champion (1994-1996, 1999, 2000), PL Stolen Base Champion (1995), PL RBI Champion (1995), Japan Series Champion (1996).

Suzuki has won multiple American Awards: MLB All-Star (2001-2010), MLB All-Star Game MVP (2007), AL Batting Champion (2001, 2004), Commissioner’s Historic Achievement Award (2005), AL MVP (2001), AL Rookie of the Year (2001), Silver Slugger Award (2001, 2007, 2009), Rawlings Gold Glove Award (2001-2010).

The veteran ball player has two MLB records. He has 262 hits in a season, that is a single season record. He racked up 225 singles in a season, which is also a single season record. An overall baseball achievement, 4,000+ hits combined in the NPB and MLB. The Japanese legend is only 156 hits shy of the prestigious 3,000-hit (in the MLB) plateau.

 

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