Eddie Rosario is having a great rookie season for the Minnesota Twins.

The 24-year-old Puerto Rican is second across all of baseball with 11 triples; his nine home runs and 16 doubles just add to impressive extra base hit power. Rosario is also a stud in what has quietly become one of baseball’s better defensive outfields, leading the American League with outfield assists and double plays turned by an outfielder.

His combination of speed and power make him a fit everywhere in the lineup and he has the ability to play all three outfield positions. Because something like an explosive triple or a sudden outfield assist can be two game changing and momentum swinging events, his fingerprints are all over a number of the Twins wins in 2015. But despite all his rookie success, there’s still a lot of aspects to his game that might drive a fan crazy.

Rosario has now stuck out 101 times this season, which is the second most of American League rookies behind only Steven Souza of the Tampa Bay Rays. With strikeouts sticking out as a big issue, the free swinging left handed hitter has only drawn 11 walks on the season, turning his .270 batting average into just a .289 on-base percentage. Souza, who has struck out 122 times in 2015, is only batting .214 but a high walk rate his on-base percentage sitting at .303.

There is a lot to be excited about with Rosario going forward and he’s just the tip of the iceberg in Minnesota with a flood of young, talented prospects reaching the Major League level around him. It’s impossible to keep him out of a starting lineup because of his extra base hit power and elite arm, but there are going to come points where he frustrates fans with his inability to get on base.

About The Author

James B. Terry

James B. Terry joined Baseball Essential as a Minnesota Twins writer in January 2015 after many years in sports media. In 2012 he co-founded BTSD Sports, a multimedia blog covering Boston sports. Terry was also a radio broadcaster for the 2013 Franklin Pierce University baseball team that advanced to the NCAA Division II College World Series. He became a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America in June 2015.

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