Five Burning Questions for the Toronto Blue Jays this offseason

 

Source: Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images North America

Source: Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images North America

2.  Will they trade a position player?

Okay, so the rotation is yet to be ironed out, and ideally some new talent needs to be brought in either from free agency or through trade. Assuming the Jays elect to use the latter method and acquire a starter through a trade it is tough to envision a package that does not include a starting position player going the other way.

The Jays are rather thin in prospects that are ready for the big leagues after giving up their better options in the moves for Ben Revere, Mark Lowe, Price, and Troy Tulowitzki last season. Aside from outfielder Dalton Pompey they have very few big league caliber prospects at this time. The most likely position players to be moved are Michael Saunders, Justin Smoak, and Edwin Encarnacion.

The Jays have options with their first base/designated hitter role as having Smoak, Chris Colabello, and Encarnacion, who are all able to produce with the long ball, gives the front office flexibility to make a deal. Saunders was supposed to be the club’s everyday left fielder coming into the season, but with his injury-plagued season, and the trade deadline acquisition of Revere, it is possible that the Jays look to move him. However at the same time, Saunders could takeover in left field which would bump Revere to center and therefore give the Jays an opportunity to move Kevin Pillar. As good of a locker room guy as Pillar is his value is likely peaking, as he narrowly missed winning a Gold Glove and sneakily had a successful season at the plate.

Recent trade rumors have surfaced between the Jays and the Indians, even going so far as to say that Cleveland would be sending a starting pitcher north while the Jays would send back an everyday outfielder. Whether anything transpires with Cleveland is anyone’s guess but the fact of the matter is Toronto’s main trade chips currently involve an outfielder, a first baseman/designated hitter, or a thriving outfield prospect.

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