Shohei Ohtani will be making the move to the majors next year, as MLB, MLBPA and NPB reaches a tentative agreement on a new posting system earlier tonight. According to Jim Allen of the Kyodo News, the expectation is that Ohtani would be posted on December 2.

If Ohani is posted on December 2, teams would be able to submit a posting fee, likely of $20 million, and be able to negotiate a contract with the 23-year-old until December 23. Joel Sherman of the New York Post reported earlier that teams would be given a three-week window to reach a deal. Whatever team ends up landing the heralded two-way player will be rewarding themselves and their fans with a lovely Christmas present.

The union had pushed for a shorter negotiating window after a player has been posted, hence the three-week window. Ohtani is still going to be subject to international amateur signing guidelines and international bonus pools, as Sherman notes in his column.

“The short window means Ohtani and his CAA representatives will have to work quickly to familiarize the righty pitcher/lefty slugger with suitors. They could do that, for example, by following, say, the Kevin Durant model of having many teams come and make a pitch in one location to Ohtani and then perhaps getting a short list of 5-6 teams for him so he could tour facilities and cities.”

The New York Yankees, who are heavy favorites to land Ohtani, can offer him $3.5 million, as the Texas Rangers have a slight edge at $3.535 million. The Minnesota Twins can also offer him $3.245 million.

The new posting agreement must be ratified by all 30 MLB teams and that won’t likely get done until next Friday, according to Sherman. Jon Morosi of MLB Network reports that the same rules of the previous posting system will apply to this offseason.

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I cover the latest in Major League Baseball news and rumors for Baseball Essential. I also am a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America (IBWAA). Follow me on Twitter at @MaxWildstein for updates on the happenings in the baseball world.

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